Tuesday, January 12, 2010

New Video: Blocking in with Color

If you receive The Poetic Landscape via email you can view the latest video on the blog or on YouTube.

This video installment shows the color block in, along with further explanations about brushwork, and some compositional adjustments.

5 comments:

AutumnLeaves said...

Jan, I am really enjoying these videos you've been posting. I am hopefully learning a few things while I watch them (though I haven't worked too much in oils/acrylics). To my eyes, it looks like you are working in oils for this piece, yes? If so, I found myself wondering how you are getting your paint to dry so quickly? I was watching you take the brush and your fingers during your demonstration and didn't see any smearing so I got caught up in the wondering why...Sigh...Anyway, I am loving watching this whole process. Today too, I find myself wondering about scale. You mentioned that the bridge just below the horizon line was a train track. When I envisioned a train on them it seemed that it would be too big for the scale of the work. Can you tell me more? Thanks so much! (I am not an art scholar nor a good artist. Just a wannabe who loves to learn!)

Kim said...

Jan, These videos you are producing are so informative. You're generous with information and it's quite interesting to be part of your decision-making process. Clear and thorough : ) Thanks!
Best, Kim

Jan Blencowe said...

Hi AutumnLeaves,

What a great question! Mostly because it gives me a chance to explain how I do an do not use photos when working from one.

I do use them to jog my memory and derive a basic composition. BUT I do not necessarily copy the photo unless the place has some historical or other distinction.

This painting doesn't seek to emphasize human presence in nature, or industrialization or machines, but rather seeks to make man's presence more diminuitive in the presence of the grandure of nature. To that end I've eliminated the scale of the bridge, the utility poles, and a whole bunch of other "railroad stuff". So inreality it is a railroad bridge but in the reality of my painting it's become something much less formidible, something dwarfed but the magnificense of the marsh.

I hope that makes some sense. Feeling the freedom to take artistic license is so important to developing your own unique point of view and to creating your own vision. Never be afraid to ruthlessly edit out those elements that don't fit your theme, motif or vision.

Jan Blencowe said...

Hi Kim,

Thanks so much! Glad you like these videos a new venture for me. I am getting a lot of positive feed back so there will be more to come.

AutumnLeaves said...

Thanks for that response, Jan. I had assumed as much but wasn't sure so I just had to ask!